Lambley Plants Arrived 20-8-2012

The latest shipment of perennial plants have arrived from Lambley.

Centaurea Bella

Caucasian Cornflower

This perennial cornflower, a Caucasian endemic, with its beautiful pinnate greyish leaves is widely used as a groundcover in the dry Mediterranean gardens of the French Riviera. Once established it is happy in any soil that isn’t bog-like. This plant is a definite weed suppressor. I’ve planted it around the tree-like Yucca filifera in a new part of the garden. Centaurea bella’s foliage grows about 10cm tall and the branching flower stems, carrying the beautifully shaped amethyst-pink flowers, are 30cm tall. (Lambley.com.au)

Centaurea Bella Caucasian Cornflower

Salvia ‘Allen Chickering’

A tall growing Californian sage which makes a dense ever-grey shrub some 120cm tall by as much across. 60cm tall flower spikes carry whorls of lavender-blue flowers. It needs a sunny spot in well drained soil and will cope with very little to no supplementary watering when once established.(Lambley.com.au)

Salvia Allen Chickering

Salvia Allen Chickering

Salvia Forskaohlei

Black Sea Woodland Sage

We first got seed of this 20 odd years ago from an Archibald collection in woodland near the Turkish Black Sea Coast. We grow it in quite dense dry shade under olive trees and next to a privet hedge. It has large handsome leaves in a loose rosette. During spring and early summer 70cm tall wands carry large deep mauve-blue flowers each with beautiful white lip markings. One of the best plants for dry shade. (Lambley.com.au)

Salvia Forskaohlei

Salvia Forskaohlei

Echium Virescens

Most echiums don’t flower well here at Lambley because of our regular heavy frosts. We got this frost hardy form of Echium virescens a decade or more ago and our original plant is still alive and flowering well. It makes a large shrub to near 2 metres by 2 metres . The narrow bristly leaves are quite grey. During early to mid spring it produces metre long spikes of lilac pink flowers. Sun loving and drought tolerant. (Lambley.com.au)

Echium Virescens

Galanthus Elwesii Early Flowered Form

I bought this 20 odd years ago as Galanthus caucasicus but it is probably an early flowered form of G. elwesii. Be that as it may it is a joy to have it flowering in the depths of winter, late June and all of July. It grows under an olive tree in the dry garden and in ten years each bulb has made a twelve fold increase. We will send these “in the green”, that is the bulbs will still be in growth and will need to be planted immediately they are received. (Lambley.com.au)

Galanthus Elwesii Early Flowered Form

Galanthus Elwesii Early Flowered Form

Galanthus Nivalis ‘S.Arnott’

English Snowdrop

“In fifty year’s time it will be interesting to see which of the newer snowdrops described in these pages will still be going strong, having established a reputation as a first class garden plant with an unquestionable constitution, admired by everyone. Such is this classic snowdrop.” This description is taken from a superb book, Snowdrops by Bishop, Davis and Grimshaw.
I can only agree with these authors. Galanthus ‘S. Arnott’ is a really good doer here at Lambley flowering during July and August. I grow them under olive trees and under maples and other deciduous trees. They don’t like spots in the garden which receive direct summer sun.
We will send these bulbs “in the green”, that is the bulbs will still be in growth and will need to be planted as soon as they are received.
We are moving our complete stock from one part of the garden to another and have good numbers for sale so we can offer them just this once at wholesale prices. (Lambley.com.au)

Galanthus Nivalis ‘S.Arnott”

Galanthus Nivalis ‘S.Arnott’

Galanthus Nivalis ‘S.Arnott’

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: