Apple Wine-Red Delicious 23-2-13

I returned from my holidays in Tasmania to find that a lot of fruit had ripened, some of it much earlier than I anticipated. The Red Delicious apples in the Grower Yards were just starting to fall from the tree.

Therefore I decided to pick a 46 litre bin full for eating and processing. There is no way we can consume that many apples before they rot so I decided to make some apple sauce and preserve that in my Fowlers Vacola Kit and make a few apple pies for freezing.

This bin was full to overflowing before I started processing the apples for bottling. Bin holds 46 litres of liquid. It is made of food grade plastic.

This bin was full to overflowing before I started processing the apples for bottling. Bin holds 46 litres of liquid. It is made of food grade plastic.

Using my trusty apple peeler and corer I peeled and cored the entire bin full and made a great batch of apple sauce and preserved that. You can see that in my Apple Sauce post.

The peeling and coring machine in full swing.

The peeling and coring machine in full swing.

The work table showing my largest stainless steel pan with the red delicous apple peeled and cored. The peels and cores amounted to about 1/3 quantity of the whole fruit.

The work table showing my largest stainless steel pan with the red delicous apple peeled and cored. The peels and cores amounted to about 1/3 quantity of the whole fruit.

When you peel and core that many apples you have a lot of leftover peel and cores. My chickens would love these and scoff them down in no time but it seemed to good to feed to the chickens, so I decided to make up a batch of apple wine. That amount of material should be enough for a full flavoured 20 litre brew.

My apple peeler and corer with the mountain of peels and cores behind. Too much and too good to waste so I made it into wine.

My apple peeler and corer with the mountain of peels and cores behind. Too much and too good to waste so I made it into wine.

Method

Day 1 23-2-13

  1. In a large fermenting bucket (food grade) tip all the peels, cores and trimmings.
  2. Cover the entire fruit with boiling water then allow to cool.
  3. When cool prepare the yeast. I used Lalvin Red M2 yeast.
  4. My yeast was very old and had expired in 2005 but still I gave it a try and it worked fine. Maybe took a little longer to build up to full strength.
  5. Stir the ‘must’ twice a day while vigorous fermentation is taking place.
  6. Cover loosely with a clean tea towel.

Day 2 24-2-13

  • The yeast is slow to build but by evening it was clearly under way.

Day 3 25-2-13

  • Yeast is now working vigorously. Mash stirred and agitated twice daily.
This is the view inside my aerobic fermenter once the yeast had multiplied sufficiently and was working vigorously.

This is the view inside my aerobic fermenter once the yeast had multiplied sufficiently and was working vigorously.

Day 4 26-2-13

  • Vigorous fermentation continues. Mash stirred and agitated twice daily.

Days 5 27-2-13

  • Fermentation continued as before. The brew smells fresh and sweet just as I want it to smell. No musty or off odours.

Day 6 28-2-13

  • Noticed reduction in vigour this morning. Should be ready to strain in a fermenter soon under airlock.

Day 7 1-3-13

  • Fermentation has slowed dramatically. This morning I set up the strainer bucket with my coarse straining cloth which is about 5mm square holes. This is to remove the bulk of the fermented fruit. Tonight I will restrain it with a fine mesh material to take out as much of the fine solids as possible. After that I will add a couple of crushed Campden Tablets and put the liquid in the glass 20l demijohn under airlock.

Day 8 2-3-13

  • Fine mesh straining completed. total volume was about 10l which I made up to 20l after siphoning into the demijohn. Two crushed campden tablets were added then put under air lock. I will do alcohol calculations this afternoon with a hydrometer and add the necessary amount of inverted sugar then ferment until the first racking in about 3  weeks.
  • Specific Gravity after making up to 20 litres 1.012.
  • Temperature 20 deg Celsius so no adjustments necessary for temperature.
  • Sugar already present from hydrometer 26+5.2 g/ltr = 31.2g/l.
  • Target alcohol = 10%.
  • Total sugar required for 10% alcohol =200g/l (from hydrometer).
  • For 20 ltrs: 20 x 200 = 4000g = 4kg.
  • Total natural sugars: 31.2 x 20 = 624g.
  • Sugar to add: 4000g – 624g = 3376g.
  • This would be a lot of extra sugar at once and the must may bog down. So I have added 2.5kg at first.
  • Balance of sugar (876g) will be added after first racking to achieve the total.

Day 9 3-3-13

  • The wine, now in the demijohn, was slow to resume strong fermentation and was slow but consistent in the morning.
  • By afternoon it was motoring along.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: