Finch Aviary Report 10th Feb 2016

The Finch Aviary has now been established a couple of months and the pairs have settled in well.

The aviary when first installed after relocating it from my old house. I have had this several

The aviary when first installed after relocating it from my old house. I have had this several years and it is very strong and sturdy. Had to lay down the pavers first and I have my sons Phillip and Tom to thank for helping with that.

Nest Boxes

New nest boxes were built and installed a few weeks ago and suitable nesting material was supplied.

Newly made finch nest boxes. They stand 17cm high and 12cm x 10cm wide and deep.

Newly made finch nest boxes. They stand 17cm high and 12cm x 10cm wide and deep.

The nest boxes are made of pine that I reclaimed from a disposable pine pallet. I put it through the thicknesser just to get a nice smooth and bright finish. Each box stands 17cm high by 12cm wide and 10cm deep. All joints were glued and nailed. The pop holes are 40mm in diameter and the perch is 10mm dowel. I randomised the location of the perches in case the birds got fussy but they don’t really seem to care one way or the other.

For nesting material I used a lot of sugar cane mulch and various dried grasses and coconut fibre. Each pair seems to have its own preferences.

The lid is hinged at the back for a quick look and easy cleaning.

First Finches

I stocked the new aviary with only three pairs to begin with although it could hold many more birds than that, to make sure they settled well and there were not special issues with the new site.

Zebra Finches

Zebra finches are quite cheap and always a good variety to start with because they breed easily. They are an Australian native finch and found in huge numbers in rural and bush locations. I have even seen a small flock hanging around the back or my shop in Kadina with some albino young.

It rained a couple of weeks ago and that triggers most finches into breeding at this time of year. I believe it is to do with the timing of native grasses flowering and giving enough seed for the young nestlings. My pair were triggered by that rain and have built a beautiful nest inside their box including lining over their heads. They also seem to have robbed a few of the empty boxes of their nest materials.

Zebra eggs in the nest. Can't see them by opening the lid because they have built a beautifully lined nest including the top.

Zebra eggs in the nest. Can’t see them by opening the lid because they have built a beautifully lined nest including the top. I can see at least 6 eggs.

 

 

A pair of zebra finches.

A pair of zebra finches. The male is on the right with the orange cheek patch.

Cut Throat Finches

These are a bit more expensive than Zebras and I have no real experience with them so will just have to wait and see.

I have checked their nest also, which was started much later being only triggered by the second rain event, and they have a single egg at the moment. It will be interesting to see how many eggs they lay.

Cut throat Finches

A pair of Cut throat finches. The male (right) has the red cut throat only.

Gouldian Finches

These are the most colourful of all my finches. An Australian native finch that likes it hot. They have not started nesting yet although the male is singing and dancing quite a lot.

Gouldian Pair. Eah sex can come in various head colours such as in this photo there is a black cap female and a red cap male. The brightest coloured bird is the male.

Gouldian Pair. Eah sex can come in various head colours such as in this photo there is a black cap female and a red cap male. The brightest coloured bird is the male.

Plants

Inside the aviary is an Oldham’s Bamboo in a large pot growing through and around the branch perch. The birds love sitting amongst the foliage of this bamboo.

 

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