Posts Tagged ‘bulbs’

2017 Bulb Delivery Number 2

January 30, 2017

The following bulbs arrived this month (January 2017) from Tesselaar in Silvan Victoria. The Tazetta is to establish yellow Jonquils as a variation from the many whites that flower prolifically in my garden while the Golden Lion Golden Trumpet Daffodil is an attempt to find a repeat flowering yellow trumpet daffodil. Many King Alfred types don’t flower in subsequent years because our winters here are too mild. Tesselaars suggest this one is suitable for wamer climates.

This is another test to find repeat flowering bulbs for South Australia’s Yorke Peninsula and other areas with a similar climate.

Narcissus Tazetta  Soleil D’Or

dajsd01

Narcissus Tazetta Soleil D’Or (PHOTO: Tesselaar.net.au)

Sunny yellow petals with cute orange cups. Similar to Golden Dawn but flowers earlier. Excellent for picking.

Also known as Jonquils or Jonquil type daffodils, Scented Daffodil flowers `cluster` together along the straight stems forming an impressive display. These blooms have a strong, sweet fragrance that carries beautifully throughout the garden.

Scented Daffodils are easy, they like the simple things in life; plenty of sun and a well drained soil. It is this sunny disposition that is appealing to gardeners worldwide. We choose the best varieties for our Australian conditions so you are guaranteed success.

It is a good idea to prepare your soil by digging through some well rotted manure (or blood and bone) a few weeks prior to planting. This will improve drainage and add nutrients to the soil, giving your Butterfly Daffodils a good start.

Plant daffodil bulbs three times as deep as the bulb is high with the pointy end up. The depth will protect them from heat and soil erosion as well as providing strength for the stem. Space your daffodils 10-20cm apart, the end range is if you are leaving the bulbs in the ground to naturalise – that way they have room to multiply and you will have longer before you have to lift and divide them.

Once the flowering has finished you can remove the flower stem (this will focus the growth on the bulb rather than seed production). Allow the foliage to remain until it has yellowed. The daffodil bulb uses the foliage to gather energy and nutrients for next year’s blooms. Keep them relatively moist during this time, and add a little general purpose fertiliser. Daffodils like Potash and slow release fertiliser brands which are low in nitrogen (this means more flowers and less leaves).

Code
DAJSD
Botantical name      Narcissus tazetta
Height                         30-70cm
Width                          10-15cm
Flowers                       Early season
Climate                       Cool to Sub-Tropical
Availability                Australia wide
Aspect                         Full Sun to Light Shade
Supplied as                Bulbs
Water needs              1

Golden Trumpets Golden Lion

daggl01

Narcissus Pseudonarcissus Golden Trumpets Golden Lion (PHOTO: Tesselaar.net.au).

Golden blooms in the traditional Daffodil trumpet style. This variety performs quite well in warmer climates where daffodils do not usually perform. The flowers open mid season.

Daffodils are easy, they like the simple things in life; plenty of sun and a well drained soil. It is this sunny disposition that is appealing to gardeners worldwide. We choose the best varieties for our Australian conditions so you are guaranteed success.

It is a good idea to prepare your soil by digging through some well rotted manure (or blood and bone) a few weeks prior to planting. This will improve drainage and add nutrients to the soil, giving your Butterfly Daffodils a good start.

Plant daffodil bulbs three times as deep as the bulb is high with the pointy end up. The depth will protect them from heat and soil erosion as well as providing strength for the stem. Space your daffodils 10-20cm apart, the end range is if you are leaving the bulbs in the ground to naturalise – that way they have room to multiply and you will have longer before you have to lift and divide them.

Once the flowering has finished you can remove the flower stem (this will focus the growth on the bulb rather than seed production). Allow the foliage to remain until it has yellowed. The daffodil bulb uses the foliage to gather energy and nutrients for next year’s blooms. Keep them relatively moist during this time, and add a little general purpose fertiliser. Daffodils like potash and slow release fertilizer brands which are low in nitrogen (this means more flowers and less leaves).

Plant as many as space permits!

Code DAGGL
Botantical name Narcissus pseudonarcissus
Height 30-70cm
Width 10-15cm
Flowers Mid season
Climate Cool to Sub-Tropical
Availability Australia wide
Aspect Full Sun to Light Shade
Supplied as Bulbs
Water needs 1

Nerine “Winter Cheer” In Flower Now 2016

May 28, 2016

This week heralds the start of flowering for Nerine “Winter Cheer”. It is a true pink and stands up to blustery, rainy conditions throughout June without any sign of damage or sagging. I purchased these bulbs from David Glenn and Criss Canning at Lambley Nursery.

Nerine "Winter Cheer" 27th May 2016. Wallaroo Mines, South Australia.

Nerine “Winter Cheer” 27th May 2016. Wallaroo Mines, South Australia.

Nerine ‘Winter Cheer’

‘Winter Cheer’ is a very late flowering variety which flowers here at Lambley through much of June and into July. A good cut flower, its rose-pink flowers are held on 50cm tall stiff stems and are cheerful addition to a winter vase.

I buy most of my bulbs from specialist growers and Lambley would be one of the best nurseries anywhere in the country. Bulbs are strong and well-grown and shipped at the right time of the year. If you are anywhere near Ballarat on any day of the year it is worth a visit. They are dry climate specialists in the truest definition without focusing only on succulents. If you want flowers every week of the year check out their website or visit their nursery, you will not be disappointed.

Deconstruct Laundry Tub Planter

February 24, 2016

This morning I emptied the Concrete Laundry Twin Tub Planter so that I could get a wheelbarrow between the aviary and the taps. In this tub I had some bulbs planted, some of which has already begun to move and three had green tops. I dug all these out and repotted them in smaller pots of 3 or 4 bulbs. I will plant these out once they finally die down and I have a planting space for them.

Aviary showing the corner of the Double laundry tub blocking access to the back section.

Aviary showing the corner of the Double laundry tub blocking access to the back section.

I will keep hold of the laundry tub and use it again in a different place. Perhaps it will become a herb planter, especially for mint which can become invasive if left to its own devices in the ground.

Nerine Fothergillii in flower after being potted on from the emptied laundry tub.

Nerine Fothergillii in flower after being potted on from the emptied laundry tub.

Flower of the Day 19th December 2013

December 19, 2013

Hippeastrum Myrna Larkham

Hippeastrum Myrna Larkham. Not sure of the correct name so I have named after Myrna from whom I bought the original plant in a pot.

Hippeastrum Myrna Larkham. Not sure of the correct name so I have named after Myrna from whom I bought the original plant in a pot. I think this may actually be Hippeastrum Stella Lace which I identified from Hippeastrum Seeds and Bulbs but check the link yourself to be sure.

I have become more and more interested in these as they are a good looking plant all year. They are dormant for a while in early winter but soon burst through the prostrate Rosemary carpet and this is their second flowering. I have allowed seed to set which I have dispersed through the garden.

Stellar Lace:

“Lovely red veins meander their way across the creamy petals and draw you into a startling green centre.
This is a very robust Hippeastrum requiring little care, but if you do pay her some attention she will reward you generously with a mass of blooms each and every Spring.” (Hippeastrum Bulbs and Seeds)
The petals are remarkably thick, but so very soft to the touch.
The perfume is subtle but long-lasting.

Lambley Plants Arrived 20-8-2012

August 21, 2012

The latest shipment of perennial plants have arrived from Lambley.

Centaurea Bella

Caucasian Cornflower

This perennial cornflower, a Caucasian endemic, with its beautiful pinnate greyish leaves is widely used as a groundcover in the dry Mediterranean gardens of the French Riviera. Once established it is happy in any soil that isn’t bog-like. This plant is a definite weed suppressor. I’ve planted it around the tree-like Yucca filifera in a new part of the garden. Centaurea bella’s foliage grows about 10cm tall and the branching flower stems, carrying the beautifully shaped amethyst-pink flowers, are 30cm tall. (Lambley.com.au)

Centaurea Bella Caucasian Cornflower

Salvia ‘Allen Chickering’

A tall growing Californian sage which makes a dense ever-grey shrub some 120cm tall by as much across. 60cm tall flower spikes carry whorls of lavender-blue flowers. It needs a sunny spot in well drained soil and will cope with very little to no supplementary watering when once established.(Lambley.com.au)

Salvia Allen Chickering

Salvia Allen Chickering

Salvia Forskaohlei

Black Sea Woodland Sage

We first got seed of this 20 odd years ago from an Archibald collection in woodland near the Turkish Black Sea Coast. We grow it in quite dense dry shade under olive trees and next to a privet hedge. It has large handsome leaves in a loose rosette. During spring and early summer 70cm tall wands carry large deep mauve-blue flowers each with beautiful white lip markings. One of the best plants for dry shade. (Lambley.com.au)

Salvia Forskaohlei

Salvia Forskaohlei

Echium Virescens

Most echiums don’t flower well here at Lambley because of our regular heavy frosts. We got this frost hardy form of Echium virescens a decade or more ago and our original plant is still alive and flowering well. It makes a large shrub to near 2 metres by 2 metres . The narrow bristly leaves are quite grey. During early to mid spring it produces metre long spikes of lilac pink flowers. Sun loving and drought tolerant. (Lambley.com.au)

Echium Virescens

Galanthus Elwesii Early Flowered Form

I bought this 20 odd years ago as Galanthus caucasicus but it is probably an early flowered form of G. elwesii. Be that as it may it is a joy to have it flowering in the depths of winter, late June and all of July. It grows under an olive tree in the dry garden and in ten years each bulb has made a twelve fold increase. We will send these “in the green”, that is the bulbs will still be in growth and will need to be planted immediately they are received. (Lambley.com.au)

Galanthus Elwesii Early Flowered Form

Galanthus Elwesii Early Flowered Form

Galanthus Nivalis ‘S.Arnott’

English Snowdrop

“In fifty year’s time it will be interesting to see which of the newer snowdrops described in these pages will still be going strong, having established a reputation as a first class garden plant with an unquestionable constitution, admired by everyone. Such is this classic snowdrop.” This description is taken from a superb book, Snowdrops by Bishop, Davis and Grimshaw.
I can only agree with these authors. Galanthus ‘S. Arnott’ is a really good doer here at Lambley flowering during July and August. I grow them under olive trees and under maples and other deciduous trees. They don’t like spots in the garden which receive direct summer sun.
We will send these bulbs “in the green”, that is the bulbs will still be in growth and will need to be planted as soon as they are received.
We are moving our complete stock from one part of the garden to another and have good numbers for sale so we can offer them just this once at wholesale prices. (Lambley.com.au)

Galanthus Nivalis ‘S.Arnott”

Galanthus Nivalis ‘S.Arnott’

Galanthus Nivalis ‘S.Arnott’

Dry Garden Update 12-08-2012

August 13, 2012
  1. The Climbing Pelargoniums planted last year are doing quite well even if they are feeling the cold at the moment. They were tied up onto the fence trellis where needed in preparation for for the Echium Simplex flowering which is about to launch. You will see in my next update why I said launch.

    Dry garden August 2012

  2. The roses have now been pruned and are just beginning to sprout new leaders.
  3. The Leonotishave done very well over the past 12 months never showing any unhappiness with complete dryness over summer and flowering right through. Even now, at the end of winter, they are producing some flowers. The problem I have is how to treat them. They clearly need to be pruned once each leader has finished flowering or you get a leggy stalk with no foliage at all although there are some side shoots from below the starting point of the flowers. In any effort to determine the best way to handle these I have cut most to the ground but just one plant was trimmed back to about 45cm, complete with a few flowers and I shall see how they go through spring and summer.

    Leonotis control plant before trimming. All others already cut to the ground. August 2012.

    Leonotis Control Plant. Trimmed. August 2012

     

  4. The bulb bed in the dry garden is growing nicely but did need a watering this week since there has been only 5mm of rain in the past 4 weeks and the bulbs are looking thirsty and a bit limp. This bed takes quite a hammering when the north wind blows and the spring winds have started these last couple of weeks.

    Dry Garden Bulb bed. August 2012

  5. Convolvulus Sabatius is beginning to make its presence felt below the birdbath. It has been suggested that it can get a bit straggly and can be cut back in winter to about 6 inches. There is no sign of that here yet so I have just left it alone. Perhaps it will need cutting back next winter.

    Convolvulus Sabatius Beside the Dry Garden Bird Bath. August 2012.

  6. Rhodanthemum Catananche “Tizi-n-Test” is a delicate very compact little plant. It has been in the dry garden for 9 months without flowering but always looked tidy and interesting. During winter is has tripled in size and is now throwing up a heap  flower spikes and looks very exciting! None have opened yet.

    Rhodanthemum Catananche Tizi-n-Test. August 2012

  7. Echium Cobalt Towers is giving mixed results at this stage. The one in the dry garden has really struggled, mostly because it seems to want more water than I expected. I know this because another one planted the same time in the Avocado garden is three times the size and looking very vigorous. The avocado garden gets watered every month during spring and summer if there has been no rain.

    Echium Cobalt Towers Struggling in the Dry Garden. August 2012

Garden Update 2012 April Week 4.

April 26, 2012

The second half of summer and all of autumn so far has been very dry but not really very hot. In the face of a forecast of rain for this week I set about the task of fertilizing the garden.

The fruit trees were all fed with Complete Mineral Mix to set them up for winter and early spring. The rest of the garden was treated with Blood and bone with added Sulphate of Potash.

The rain duly fell, if not in the quantities hoped for, yet there is a forecast for more during the week so it will all end okay.

Bulbs in the dry garden have poked their shoots above the ground and with their feed of Blood and Bone I hope to see a great display this spring.


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